Problem Of Pain – Burn What My Hands Wrought review

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Where do my demons hide?
Let this false god die.
I won’t let you linger.
Let this false god die.
Burn what my hands wrought.
Burn. – “Burn What My Hands Wrought”

I’ve been a longtime fan of the chaotic resonance found with The Chariot. The demise of the band left a enormous hole in the music scene. But now that cavity has been filled by the metalcore of Problem Of Pain. The Michigan duo (Garrett Finch – guitar, vocals, Jake Beaver – drums, vocals) have released an exceptional debut full-length. The album brings a maturity of musicianship that is astounding considering both their young age and that the band came together just over a year ago. 

The forceful nature of Problem Of Pain’s, Burn What My Hands Wrought is expressed with a brevity usually seen only on a punk release. Yet the album remains unhurried, gathering time to structure each song while forging abrupt time signature changes.

Lyrically, Burn What My Hands Wrought, doesn’t just ask for the listeners attention, it demands it. The album travels a rough ride, filled with the uneasiness of a life bound in conflict.

The blade remains, your hand the same.
Tell yourself it’s worth the pain.
Hammer strike, feel no pain.
Calloused like the rest.
Whetstone, ease the pain; a dull edge will take days, (Refine).
Make the incision, nothing but blood.
Give the pain. (Regret).
Pain.
Take the bad, cut the noose,
fall to your face, it’s worth the pain. – “(Forge) – Feed The Flame”

Musically, the album breaks momentarily from harshness during the melodic, “I Cursed the Sun for the Darkness” and “Regret // Empty”. But Problem Of Pain is out to deliver their message with an aggression that’s unsurpassed.

No easy solution is provided when the album closes with “Breathe Easy // Barely Breathing”.

The martyrs’ grave lies under my feet.
Their cries heard through gnashing teeth.
Planting seeds. harvest. Lying down. Shorted out.
Justify standing by. Stay home.
Breathe easy. Barely breathing.

With such a stellar debut from Problem Of Pain, it’s difficult to imagine how the band’s music will progress or surpass what’s been crafted on Burn What My Hands Wrought.

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